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Psathoura Lighthouse

<p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island. Photos and text Biologist, mr Giorgos Katsadorakis " width="1024" height="768"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island" width="1024" height="682"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island" width="1024" height="682"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island" width="1024" height="677"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island" width="576" height="768"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The Ladder with 115 marble planter wall stairs leading to the lantern" width="1024" height="682"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="Inscription 1893. The lighthouse on Psathoura island" width="1024" height="682"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island" width="1008" height="768"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The relatively accurate sketch of the view of the building of the Lighthouse." width="1024" height="682"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island" width="1024" height="682"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island" width="1024" height="682"/> <p>The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done. </p>

<p>It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings. </p>

<p>It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.</p>

<p>When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very <br />
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away. </p>

<p>It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier. </p>

<p>During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships). </p>

<p>It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.</p>

<p>When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days. </p>

<p>The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.</p>

<p>The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.</p>

<p>The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.</p>

<p>Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse. </p>

<p>The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its <br />
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.</p>

<p>SOURCE and more info at <a href=lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT

" title="The lighthouse on Psathoura island. Photos and text Biologist, mr Giorgos Katsadorakis " width="989" height="768"/>

The lighthouse of Psathoura. The lighthouse of Psathoura was built in 1895 after the shipwreck of a Danish ship that was the last straw: these reefs were too dangerous for shipping and something had to be done.

It was built on the plans of French engineers, by Skopelos stone masons who used stone from the island, while only the marble steps were brought in, along with another softer that was easier to work, for the edges of the building and the openings.

It is set on a rocky ground, while around the base of the tower of the lighthouse there is a house where the guards live.

When it was constructed, the light worked with a system that burned a mixture of air and vapourised oil, which of course required constant presence of the guard who would light it and put it out and monitor it so that it would work well. Then the light was constant towards all directions and it was very
powerful and blinding; it could be seen from 19 miles away.

It was so powerful that the old fishermen can remember that if you were near the island at night you couldn’t see because the glare was blinding, as it created an impermeable light barrier.

During WW2, the lighthouse was put out and the guards received orders to light it only on special occasions (obviously to facilitate the Axis Alliance ships and make it difficult for ally ships).

It was lit again in 1945. To 1987 when the oil system was replaced by photovoltaic electricity, the presence of the guards was constant.

When the lighthouse guard stopped living on the island with his family, which was the case from the beginning to about the 70s, the lighthouse guards had shifts two by two that lasted about 10 days.

The new shift would arrive to exchange the previous shift. In 1987 the lighthouse was converted to automated monitored sun-powered. This means that it operates on its own, but every so often the relevant lighthouse guards visit for maintenance.

The height of the lighthouse tower is 26 metres, while the light is a total of 40 metres above sea level.

The light from the lighthouse today is emitted in 6 beams from a halogen lamp, but the observer at sea sees this as off for 10” and lit up for 1”.

Its range today is 17 n.m. and it is one of the largest lighthouses in the Aegean. I found some of the above information in the article “Lighthouses in Greece” by Filippos Pontikis in issue 83 of the EFOPLISTIS magazine, which I found in the lighthouse.

The rest I was told by the guard in charge Giorgos P. I am grateful to the Lighthouse Service of the Hellenic Navy that gave the permission to use the lighthouse for my research and accommodated me in the lighthouse for all those das. I also thank H.N. Ensign for introducing me to the lighthouse and its
secrets and facilitating my stay, but also new guard Kostas L.

SOURCE and more info at lifeatfaros.blogspot.com/

George Katsadorakis biologist, ornithologist, Management Specialist and Environmental Interpretation
During his stay in Faro in the spring of 2007 with the support of WWF, ORNITHOLOGII GREEK COMPANY, MOm and HELLAS SAT